By: Savannah Jacobs

Tribal affiliation: Oglala Lakota

Major: Political Science

This is the second semester Sun Devils are battling through the COVID-19 pandemic. As we keep a constant daily health check on ourselves and loved ones, we might’ve diagnosed ourselves for a common symptom we definitely felt lately: a lack of motivation. As students, we already know how difficult it can be to find motivation and keep up with routines, but with quarantining and keeping distant from friends and family for months now, it didn’t help that everything remained virtual and remote once again. We’re experiencing symptoms of cabin fever, changes in environment, mental and physical health depletion, and suffering from lack of structure, communication and in-person contact. We need something to drive our sense of competence, autonomy and connection to others as we continue to navigate this new normal.

It’s been a difficult road to recover myself from identity crisis, senioritis, being away from home, and finding my own routine in all of this. Pre-diagnosis I was waking up at 8 a.m., attending in-person classes, going to work at the Center for Indian Education, finishing school work, off to my second job as a waitress, and then home by 11 p.m. It’s aching to take that first step to take your daily dose of consistency, but one thing I keep in mind is that Arizona State has a strong and supportive Indigenous community! Together we can take these first steps toward motivation recovery as we continue to be safe and do our part in stopping the spread of the virus.

Seven steps to self motivation

  1. Prioritize your physical and mental health. Reach out.
  2. Set small daily goals.
  3. Carve out time in your day for work and relaxation.
  4. Remove yourself from distractions.
  5. Take on study sessions with friends for schoolwork.
  6. Schedule virtual get togethers for fun.
  7. Recognize the little things.

Tools to help

Try out free gratitude and happiness apps that help people learn to be more thankful and appreciative of life. These digital tools aim to increase happiness and overall improve wellness.

Turning Points Magazine is the first ever Native college magazine written by Native students for Native students @asu